Gardening in the Valley of Heart's Delight
Rose Jelly
Does rose jelly sound odd to you? It does to most Americans. But flower-scented sweets are common in many other cultures; I've even bought chocolate-covered rose and violet creams in England. Somehow the tradition got lost in the U.S. No time like the present to revive it! This jelly has a delicious, delicate flavor and is not, as I've been asked on occasion, like eating perfume. Rose jelly
Vying for the title of 'Karen's Most Scented Rose' are Etoile de Hollande and Magnifica. So it was with petals from these two that I made this magnificent batch of rose jelly.
Etoile de Hollande
Etoile de Hollande
Magnifica
Magnifica
If your roses are lacking in scent or color, or if you lack roses altogether, you can use culinary rose essence (try looking in an Indian spice shop) and food coloring. Gentle with the essence, though! Too much of that may perfume the jelly excessively.
Rose Jelly

4 c. scented rose petals
2 c. water
3 1/2 c. sugar
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 pkg Certo liquid pectin

Wash the rose petals well and place in pan with water. Cover and bring to a boil. Immediately remove from heat and set aside to steep. When cool, strain juice through cheesecloth or jelly bag. Measure out 2 c of juice. Add sugar and lemon juice; bring to a full, rolling boil. Add liquid pectin and bring back to boil, stirring constantly. Boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat and skim off foam. Fill sterilized jars to 1/8" from top. Screw on lids and rings. Invert jars for 5 minutes, then return upright.

This jelly is especially nice on English muffins.

A bowl of rose petals
A bowl of rose petals
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Copyright 1997 by Karen Schaffer
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